OPEN STUDIO/SHOP IN PERSON: Sept. 10th-11th

I’ve just completed a new batch of goodies and I’m opening our studio doors for to show it all off. I’ll be showcasing new artwork along side my limited edition clothing and accessories. Prepare to have yer socks knocked off. Sat. Sept. 10th and Sun. Sept. 11th // Noon til 7PM
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TIME OUT NY FEATURES MOVES AND TEICH

This is a bit late but two of my NYC stores were recently featured in time out New York! Congrats and both of these nifty establishments were sure to mention Junkprints. So let me tell you a bit about both stores. Whether you are a long time O.G. native New Yorker or the visiting tribe, you'll get a kick out of both of these establishments.

Teich Design

22 Eighth Ave (at 12th St) West Village
(212) 537-6630teichdesign.com
Subway: A, C, E to 14th StGet directions
Tue–Sat noon–7pm, Sun noon–6pm
This is what Time Out NY had to say about the store.
Husband and wife Allison and JJ McGowan opened the second branch of their mom-and-pop boutique to balance out the big-name chain stores inhabiting the West Village. In addition to the bags that made Teich’s original East Village shop popular (such as vintage-inspired lambskin clutches, $125), the new space offers exclusive products made by other local labels, including Studio DuArte, Noli Noli and Grass & Clovers. The space is eco-friendly with recycled-rubber floors, salvaged-wood shelves and walls painted with nontoxic paint. The charming displays of unique men’s and women’s accessories attract passersby, who can get their hands on creative finds like Sherry Truitt recycled sterling-silver, vintage-NYC-map cufflinks ($50). There are also Junkprints necklaces made from a laser-cut vinyl record ($40), a Bobby Joseph stuffed bear created out of a repurposed leather skirt ($250) and an Uptown Artworks cotton West Village street-sign pillow ($120).
They are the exclusive carrier of The junkprints NYC Hearts me necklaces.

Moves

214 Franklin St (suite 102 between Green and Huron Sts) Greenpoint/Williamsburg, Brooklyn
Subway: G to Greenpoint AveGet directions
Wed–Sun 1–9pm
Let me tell you how much I love RHLS founders Macks and Sarah. There brains are magical and they make and currate a fantatstic collection of clothing accessories and accoutrements. Local clothing label Ruffeo Hearts Lil’ Snotty, which has been outfitting Brooklyn’s cool crowd in crazy-colorful streetwear since 2006, has opened its first NYC shop. Look for the telltale sandwich board on the sidewalk, ring a buzzer marked "hot dog" and head down the hallway until you hit the minimalist white-brick–walled space with gunmetal-painted floors.
This store carries an assortment Of the Junkprints trilateral Necklaces, tees and bags. Visit now!
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JUNKPRINTS? IN A CHELSEA GALLERY? OPENING JULY 21st

Yep that's rights. Junkprints will be in a Chelsea Gallery. Join me at the opening of Make Skateboards, at I-20 Gallery 55 West 23rd Street,New York, NY 10011-1102 on July 21st. The following is the press release and all the details. DATES:    JULY 21 – SEPTEMBER 17, 2011 SHOP HOURS:    TUESDAY – SUNDAY, NOON – 8 PM OPENING:    THURSDAY, JULY 21, 6 – 8 PM I-20 Gallery is pleased to announce MAKE SKATEBOARDS, a group exhibition and pop-up skate shop conceived as a throwback to the days when art took precedence over branding and a welcoming vibe met you at the door. The show will be a playful take on running a skateboard shop, transforming I-20 into a functional retail space offering a custom line of artist-designed skateboards, skate-related ephemera and accessories, original artwork, vintage objects, custom furniture and clothing by up-and-coming New York designers. A true working skate shop, MAKE SKATEBOARDS will offer decks that are fully skate-able yet designed to an artistic standard. Two types of boards will be available: affordable, limited-edition silk-screened skateboards; and one-of-a-kind decks altered and embellished by hand, including several conceptual takes on the idea of skateboarding itself. While contemporary art, skateboarding and other forms of street culture are at the forefront of current popular tastes, these worlds remain surprisingly inaccessible to much of the public. The creative interaction and welcoming feel of MAKE SKATEBOARDS will attempt to bridge this divide from a convenient location in the heart of the Chelsea art district, just a few short blocks from the Pier 62 Skate Park. MAKE SKATEBOARDS’ inventory will change and grow throughout its two-month run, offering ever-changing aesthetics and variety to art patrons and skaters alike. Some of the pieces exhibited will result from collaborations with community groups such as the Brooklyn-based League Education & Treatment Center’s L.A.N.D. Gallery, a creative-outreach program for artists with disabilities. The shop will also join forces with KCDC, one of New York’s most established and respected skate shops. A string of weekly parties will celebrate new shop arrivals, book signings, album launches, and secret band nights. While most galleries close their doors for much of August, the MAKE Skateboards shop will stay open, serving as a refuge from the hot summer weather. MAKE SKATEBOARDS was conceived by artist and filmmaker Scott Ogden and organized in conjunction with Jonathan Lavoie, Director of I-20 Gallery. This summer’s event will be the first of many pop-up incarnations of the shop. For more information or visuals, please contact: makeskateboards@i-20.com or call (212) 645-1100. PARTICIPANTS: Michael Alan, Michael Anderson, Hawkins Bolden, Slater Bradley, Carlton DeWoody, Chris Dorland, David Ellis, Orly Genger, Debra Hampton, Drew Heitzler, Horse Cycles, Grant Huang, Junk Prints, Jacob Kassay, Marina Kappos, KCDC, Sarah Kurz, Curtis Kulig, Wes Lang, L.A.N.D., Robert Lazzarini, Cameron Martin, Moris (Israel Meza Moreno), Scott Ogden, Olek, Erik Parker, Parts + Labor Workshop, Joyce Pensato, RePOP, Prophet Royal Robertson, Jenn Ruff, Tom Sanford, Eduardo Sarabia, Peter Saul, Bill Saylor, Kenny Scharf, Ivory Serra, Shelter Serra, MiYoung Sohn, Tony Bones, Vincent Szarek, Bruce Lee Webb, WHIT makeskateboards.com
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BRAIN RE-WIRE

I have been a really bad blogger lately and have been a bit MIA over the last month on social media networks, and ya'll know how I love me some twitter. Well my friends and frenemies, here's why. I have been rewiring my brain, and assessing the next major creative move for Junkprints. I consider my self an artist who happens to be using textiles as a medium, but have never really considered myself a 'fashion designer' The reason for that is because generally, the culture around fashion is stuffy (and art's not right? I'll get to that later) and I'm not formally trained in it. So in some ways I don't have the brainwashing that makes me worship it. That being said, I love clothing, dressing clever, costumes, and vintage archives and many designer collections, I just don't like the fuss around it, and all the 'tastemakers' being 'nonhuman like' to boost the importance of wearing the perfect shade of magenta this season...it's just not the serious. To me clothing and adornment is to support a mood and cover the bits that the public is uncomfortable with seeing, and keep us warm/cool and 'protected' while expressing us. It's to inspire us, not make us feel unworthy. Here's the dilemma with having an artist making clothing, well to be perfectly honest, I do not like making things over and over again. I never did. Once the concept, design is resolved in my mind and in execution, I feel like my work is done. That puts one in quite a predicament if the item requires pattern grading, sizing and material sourcing. I've never been one to go half on things so for the last few years I have taken this on and with an extreme gusto and passion. Over the last few months I realized that this may be smashing up my creative process. No one wants their creativity all smashed up, so I've take  a moment to rewire my brain and come up with a plan of action. I will continue to make engaging work...no matter what!  I am shifting gears a bit and am creating art...just art, not art for a tee...just art. Recently I've sold some large pieces including the one below. I also have a show coming up in a swanky Chelsea Gallery as well as a solo show in Delaware next year. Deets soon to come. In addition to the art I'm gearing up for licensing. Yep that's right, I'll be playing with the corporate world, but don't worry I'll be wise with my licensing and will be more on the L.A.M.B. side of the table than the god awful Ed Hardy (believe it or not the dude is talented he's just a licensing whore) side of the table.  The plan is to be extremely hands on while utilizing there resources and distribution. I still need all the work that stems for Junkprints to have integrity and am excited about working with the grown ups. This licensing thing is in the works and I probably won't have stuff to show for a while, giants move slow you know, but I'm working with some great business folks on getting this done and it will be most amazing. So with all this new stuff going on, you may see lots of one of a kind items on junkprints including clothing and I apologies in advance if it's not available in your size, for now I will be prototyping, just like when I first started...keeping, the creative juices flowing. Due to all these changes, many items currently on the Junkprints.com will be ending there editions early, basically I'm selling what I have in stock and will not be making more, particularly on the clothing.  So if you see a tee or hoodie you have your eye on, snag it now...cuz once it's gone it's gone.
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JUNKPRINTS IN TORONTO at SUPAFRIK

Hi Sunshines, I have some super exciting news! Junkprints is being carried at a brand new pop up shop Called SUPAFRIK in Toronto, and of course in none other than Kensington Market. 181 Augusta Ave. Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 2L4 Supafrik is an experimental pop-up concept. A blend of art exhibition and retail, Supafrik will showcase the work of artists and entrepreneurs that are inspired by Africa.  Loosely curated around the theme of “Urban Contemporary Africana”, Supafrik will feature artwork and merchandise that re-contextualise and re-imagine traditional African aesthetics and tradition with a post-modernist eye.  In addition to the Afrotropolis fashion collection by Chinedesign, Supafrik will be stocked with unique artwork, books, music, t-shirts, shoes furniture and home-ware collected by Chinedu throughout his travels in New York, London and Paris.  Supafrik will also have social-media interactivity that will allow anybody with an internet connection to participate in some of the activities planned over the duration of the pop up shop such as the stylized photoshoot, book reading and design workshop. BTW: They have the last editions of the Hairy Hair tees. So if you slept on 'em while I had 'em in stock you can cop 'em here.

and one more thing, The Opening Party July 15, 2011 7:00 pm - 11:00 pm.

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NEW DENIM

I hated wearing a uniform as an elementary and middle school student. Hey I could totally understand kids were getting shot left in right for wearing colors. Our school colors were navy and white, so we just looked like preppy crips. Though we did have lots of options, pleated skirts, box pleated skirts pants, shorts etc. When I was 13 my mom decided that I would look super cute in the pinstripe shorts with the suspenders. Long story short, for a good chunk of 8th grade I went to school looking like Pinocchio. In the era of cross colors, yes I was dressed like a fiddler. Needless to say i really hated taking the bus home that year. Don't worry I made up for my fashion restrictions in high school and spend those 4 years damn near dressing in drag, including bright wigs and stripper shoes at times. Recently I came across alot of dark denim and I've decided to take on a lil challenge and take a new approach to classic styles, pleats, denim. Basically I want to restructure the basics.

This skirt is made from a slightly stretchy denim, features a large front zipper and huge hip pleats. The waist band is French seamed (yeah I went all out on this). It is currently  available on junkprints and is made to order and has a production time of 7 business days.

The pants are coming soon, I'm currently grading the patterns and getting that fit just right 😉
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JUNKPRINTS IS GOING TO PHILLY: SAT JUNE 11th

On Saturday, June 11th, 2011 Junkprints will be in Philly at the 10th Annual B-Boy BBQ in Philly. This yearly experience is going to be quite spectacular. It is an oppurtunity for people of all walks of life to exper…ience all aspects of hip-hop culture from graffiti to breakdancing, emceeing and deejaying. Every year there is influx of 400-500 people to the site of the B-Boy BBQ where they can witness local, national and internationally renowned artists in action and shop the nearly 100 vendors selling everything from spraypaint and clothing to food and face painting. This event is in the tradition of Rock Steady Day, Meeting of Styles and other large scale hip-hop events. I'm super duper excited to be participating in this event. This is the very first time The junkprints goodies will be in the streets of Philly. Don't miss this one day opportunity. 48th and Westminister, West Philly Saturday June 11th, 8am-8pm
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BUST CRAFTACULAR SATURDAY MAY 21st.

The BUST Magazine spring shopping extravaganza is back and better than ever!  This year, we’re bringing together 100+ unique vendors and food artisans for one day in the heart of SoHo including your favorite junkmaker rump shaker, moi and Junkprints. Stop by for the best handmade goodies. Plus: raffles, DJs, book signings, and a free goodie bag for the first 300 people! Saturday, May 21st, 2011 82 Mercer Street Between Broome and Spring New York, NY 11am-8pm 1 day only!
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“Let’s Collab”…but first read this

col·lab·o·rate/kəˈlabəˌrāt/Verb

1. Work jointly on an activity, esp. to produce or create something.
With in the last year I've noticed a spike in Junkprints collaboration inquiries. In one way this is awesome, because it means that I am making stuff that others want to be apart of and have hopes of contributing.  I can definitely appreciate that. Sadly, more often than not these so called collaborations are request to do some form of what I do for junkprints for another line, company or individual. In this case, the request is not actually 'collaboration' it's a request for a donated commission (a.k.a. a favor). A perfect collaboration should result in something new and valuable to all parties involved.  I've done a few of those and they are amazing. So I decided create a list of Rules of Engagement based off what I've learned from those and the bad 'collaborations'. RULES OF ENGAGEMENT: The terms must be clear. What do you want and what do you want from me? How long do you propose this would take? what would be the final outcome, etc.  If you are requesting to 'collab'. You should have clarity for what you're seeking. We're all busy bees. If you are unsure what you want to it wastes my time and your time. Two companies that offer the same thing don't generally make good collaborators. For example: 'Hi I'm a tee shirt designer/illustrator/graphic designer, I'd love to collaborate on some tees with Junkprints' This translates to: 'Hi, I want to do what you do, and would like to cross into your market, utilize your manufacturing resources and will you work on some tees for free for me so that I can brag about it (and you can brag about it too) and we can share the success.' Well all that is fine and dandy, but unless you have a substantial larger audience than I do then what's in it for me? Keep it classy (that word is funny to me, but it does apply) Don't hit up the person you would like to collaborate with in a public social network. i.e, a tweet of facebook wall. I know it seems easy and direct, but can you really convince someone of your worth as far as collaborating in less than 140 characters? You are tying your own hands. Do some research get the persons email address, figure out a good time to call them and state your proposal. If you don't hear back from them follow up...let me tell ya barely anyone follows up, you'd be amazed at the results persistence and consistency yields. If while you are figuring out what you want from the person/company that you want to collaborate with and you discover that you have nothing to offer towards the collaboration besides 'talent' then you are looking to commission work from them and you should be prepared to pay for this commission in some form or another. Keep in mind that requesting a collaboration is a bit like courting. Be creative, clear, honest and confident about you can bring to the table. Make your services/resources of value to the person/company you wish to collaborate. Featured picture: Robbed Tee by Junkprints available on Junkprints.com
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