Black Artstory Month 2014: Native Sons and Daughters Opening Reception Feb. 1st 8p-10p,

Black Artstory Month 2014: Native Sons and Daughters Feb. 1st-28th

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Opening Reception Feb. 1st 8p-10p, The Emerson  561 Myrtle Avenue Brooklyn, NY
Black Artstory month celebrates the enduring influences and contributions made by African Americans within the visual and performing arts world. I am honored to have works included in two locations for this exhibition.
The Emerson   561 Myrtle Avenue

Dee and Rickys 503 Myrtle Ave

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Black Future Month Exhibition Feb. 1st

BLACK FUTURE MONTH 3014 at Feb. 1st-28th
The 1st of its kind in Toronto, its a Group Art Exhibition centered around Afrofuturism. Several artist taking a creative look into our distant future.

future_monthCheck out the opening:

BLACK FUTURE MONTH 3014 at Feb. 1st-28th
Opening Reception Feb. 1st 6p-11p, Daniels Spectrum: 585 Dundas St East, Toronto, ON

Fore More info check out the facebook page

https://www.facebook.com/events/379094675570534/

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The NYC Future Project!

I’m thrilled to announce a new project I’m working on. It’s called the NYC Future project. It’s a mobile photobooth project. I’m shooting a series of portraits and asking folks to write down one word that they feel embodies NYC 25 Years into the future. Here’s a sneak peak into what I have so far. This is an ongoing project be sure to follow me on twitter//instagram//facebook//tumblr for updates of where I’ll be shooting across NYC.#nycfutureproject

The project site is live but in a beta stage. Here’s  link

#nycfutureproject
#nycfutureproject
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WHERE THE HELL IS THE NEW JUNK

Remember when I use to post a new item everyday? I do. It was crazy. I had this loft bed that I would work under. Coming up with designs on a daily, making like a crazy person. I miss making that way and am looking forward to creating with that type of vigor. Just so you know that loft bed has since been cut down (i no longer need a ladder o go to sleep) and the operation has moved from under it. The last year has been a bit of a grown folks bootcamp. I turned thirty years old and was was like, ‘WTF I need to get my shit together, I haven’t traveled the world, stabilized my biz nor figured out if I believe in money or not” Believe it or not within that confusion I discovered that I’m a pretty nifty soft goods stylists and have been working  for People stylewatch, Elle, Moda Operadi and PVH, Calvin Klein.

It’s been a long time since I’ve listed new junk and shot pictures, I’ve been on the crazy grind and most of my time and energy has been spent doing editorial product styling, my name is floating on your local newsstands but my ‘junk ideas, concepts, political commentary and sillyness’ has been pretty much stuck in my head. The creative process is a funny one, if you don’t get the ideas out you get mind constipation. That’s what I’m dealing with right now. A dusty studio space and straight up mind constipation.

Don’t get me wrong, taking some time off has been a good thing for the following:

  • It made me realize that I run junkprints as an outlet for the stuff I make. I don’t make stuff for junkprints. Basically, the business follows the art, not the other way around, stuff gets real fowl when it goes the wrong way. Some of you hard core entrepreneur number crunching business folks may think that’s crazy talk, but frankly my dear, I just don’t give a damn. It’s important that I create work that is valuable, if it’s profitable then that’s a plus. It’s important to me that junkprints is driven by value. I’ve tried the profit model and the reality is that there are waaaaay better ways too make money then making stuff and  for me, that’s a hard reality to come to. Writing it sounds so simple, guess that’s how lessons go.
  • Got real with monies, and answered some questions like where do you REALLY see yourself in 5 years.
  • Visited New Orleans for the first time
  • Took my dad to Costa Rica,
  • I took a real estate course, (just so I could see how things work, I’m this close to getting that building),
  • Had my lil sister move in (and have been gently kicking her in the butt, yay she’s in college and will not be in debt),
  • Severed some ties with some close folks in my life and have also sent some really valuable time with some other close folks
  • Taking hot yoga hard core consistently for over a year (thx @sacred).
  • Sandy happened, what a mess
  • Trayvon had his right to live taken from him, and a case made clear that the US court supports the notion that  Black male Americans are threatening and it’s ok to shoot them (and I don’t want to talk about it on facebook).
  • Been watching most of my friends breed like rabbits, babies everywhere! Amazing and strange
  • Also, I’ve been graveling with social networks, personally, I don’t really like them as ‘social networks’, but I love them for inspiration and as outlets for stuff created.
  • All in all, I’ve been breathing, and being private

Finally, I’ve had a chance to let some of this creativity out, this is just a weee bit, a very very cotton candy soft launch but here it is. I was a bit nervous shooting this time around. It’s been a year and within that time I’ve managed to amass some insecurities and garner some new super powers.
Either way. Thanks for the support on this journey and enjoy the new junk, it’s so well made it’s ridiculous.

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DETROIT AN OUTSIDERS PERSPECTIVE

Let’s chat about Detroit. The first (and last time) time that I ever visited Detroit was for a family reunion. I was 14 years old and went with my paternal grandmother. She and my grandfather grew up there and moved to southern california before the idea of me, other grandchildren and great grandchildren ever existed. That place was the most depressing place that I had ever seen in my life. This was the 90’s, Southern cali was gang land and wearing certain colors could get you rough up or killed, but Cali wasn’t hopeless. It was tense. There’s a quite a difference and that is what I learned as a 14 year old. I had never been to a city that had weeds the sizes of trees growing out of the freeways. It felt like no one cared about this place. They didn’t even care enough to be angry.  Maybe folks use to care about the place, but no one cares about it now. This was the first time that I had ever seen a 7-11 that one could not go in, and was made of bullet proof glass, put the money in the bullet proof plexi turny thing at the counter and then the clerk slides around your change and request. I visited the ‘great’ Motown museum that looked as though it was falling apart at the seams. I had the opportunity to meet my relatives and see my grandmother be frustrated and annoyed. She’s quite a composed lady so this was very rare form for her, but it was something I appreciated. It made her seem like a more dynamic person and I understood that she had made quite a concerted effort not to be in Detroit. This is the same woman who lived in NY and worked as a nurse and at one point even lived in Alaska. That’s a different story though. Let’s get back to Detroit.

Detroit felt like it use to be amazing, a long time ago, and folks kept reminding others that it use to be amazing as the the city is slowly falling apart. It was like showing up to a party 20 years too late. Since that trip I’ve been facsinated with Detroit…from a distance. It’s amazing and bazaar that a place that I have always felt represents many if not most American cities. Industry comes, folks work and live, industry leaves and the folks are stuck. Eventually trains stop rolling through, flights become few and far between, those that can leave do those that can’t or won’t stay and become forgotten. This seems like it can happen to just about any city in America. I’ve always felt that If there is a revival for the Motor City it will be spearheaded by artists and DIY folks, both insiders and outsiders. A few years ago when I first caught wind that one could buy a house in in Detroit for the cost of one months NYC rent. My ears perked up a bit and I mentioned to a few friends that we should but a few places near each other and set up shop…but  I wondered if I had enough optimism to actually live in Detroit or if the hopelessness would swallow me.  Well, I guess I decided that the hopelessness would swallow me and decided that it’s not my journey right now.

In the nature of artists creating awareness I recently saw to documentaries that addressed Detroit…in two different ways.

The first one is Searching for Sugar Man. It’s a Swedish/British documentary directed by Malik Bendjelloul. It is about is an American folk musician Sixto Díaz Rodríguez based in Detroit, Michigan. His career initially proved short-lived with two little-sold albums in the early 1970s and some brief touring in Australia. Unbeknownst to him, however, his work proved extremely successful and influential in South Africa, although he was mistakenly rumoured in that country to have committed suicide. In the 1990s, determined South African fans managed to seek out and contact him, leading to an unexpected revival of his musical career. Their story is told in, Searching for Sugar Man, which has also helped give Rodríguez a measure of fame in the U.S. I enjoyed that Rodríguez continued to live out the themes and views addressed in his music even though his music carreer was pretty much non existant for most of his life. He worked from the inside out and is a bit of a reminder that, it’s not a race. It’s not linear. It’s life and that’s all. One more thing…he makes Bob Dylan’s music seem like elevator music. A portion of it was shot with an iphone proving that many of us have all the tools we need to create in our pockets…pretty powerful.

I saw Detroitopia and was happy to see a documentary that tackled many perspectives on the city of Detroit. Detroitopia focused mainly on the economy and was directed by Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady. ‘The three Detroiters who are profiled are video blogger Crystal Starr, nightclub owner Tommy Stephens, and United Auto Workers local President George McGregor, each of whom reflect on their own experiences and share their observations about the city, its problems, and its opportunities. Also featured are portions of Mayor Dave Bing’s discussions with city officials and residents about the possibility of geographically consolidating Detroit residents as a cost-saving measure. A group of artists, mostly newcomers to Detroit, are shown as well, particularly Steve and Dorota Coy. The Coys, who are performance artists, are featured on the poster and DVD cover for the film.’ (info courtesy of wikipedia) The artists they showed kinda annoyed me. I have issues with outsiders being too large of a representative for problem solving. I wish they were working more with the local community (or if that was shown, if they are). That’s my own issue though, and overall I was happy to see that the city was thoughtfully and sensitively documented.

Detroit may still have a bit of magic left. What are your thoughts?

 

 

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Upcoming Gallery Exhibition! OPENING JAN 27th

IONA College Council on the arts
715 North Avenue, New Rochelle, NY 10801
BlackHair: Black Identity
Sunday Jan 20th-Thursday Feb 21

Opening reception Sunday January 27th 1p-3p
Curated by Peridot Smith
Featuring art by Natassia Davis, Chanel Kennebrew, Soo Yoon Lym, Jamel Shabazz, Alexandria Smith, James Petrozzello,
Tabitha Bianco Brown, Toyin Odutola, Philece R. and Peridot Smith

Refreshments
Live Music by DJ Spawn
Live hair styling Demonstration by Diva Designs and Cuts by D
For further Information, call 917637-7796 or visit www iona.edu/artscouncil

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HOLIDAY 2012 POP UP SHOP! NEW YORK, NY November 17, 2012

I’m always honored to rock with the Toofly, Circa95 crew. Just received the press release which means the pop up shop is officially on and Junkprints (aka me) will be there! See below for the deets.

LADIES LOVE PROJECT
PRESENTS:

HOLIDAY 2012 POP UP SHOP!
Shopping Event Showcases Brazen Art, Avant-Garde Fashion & Design at the  University Settlement!

On Saturday, November 17, 2012, the LADIES LOVE PROJECT presents its 6th POP-UP SHOP at University Settlement 183 Eldridge St from 12pm – 10pm. The PROJECT, a brainchild of renowned street artist TOOFLY, sound sensation PattyDukes & Rephstar of the Circa95 duo and creative non-profit efficionado A.Mari, highlights some of NYC’s most creative underground artists and designers.  The one-day-only event boasts an intimate, yet extraordinary colorful market shopping experience – designed to familiarize consumers, media and tastemakers with artists currently celebrating prominence.

Featured female market designers and artists include Toofly, Junkprints, Vanilla Medallions, Dominique Reneè, Shiro – as well as the fellas Marka27, Rebelution, Soh Nup Ink,  and a host of others, will be exhibiting one of a kind, limited edition, handcrafted goods just in time for the holidays! Event music across all genres will be handled by RephStar and Dj Enygma. A live broadcast of the event will be streamed all day at www.Circa95.com and will include the first ever performance showcase by Brooklyn based rap sensation, and self-proclaimed “Mistress of Ceremonies,” Jasmine Solano. Complimentary empanadas, coquito, and cupcake treats will be served by Jenny Kinns Cupcakes, Mi Isla Coquito, and Martha’s Kitchen.  Funky fresh ladies in the *new* LLP Lounge will be rocking make-up makeovers, dope nail art, and tarot card readings. This year the photo fun will continue with homegirls Sheena She on deck with event photography and Samantha Morales holding down the LLP Photobooth!

University Settlement, a celebrated art and community space located in the Lower East Side, plays host to the eclectic mix of prosperous and established talent. Art pieces on canvas, jewelry, t-shirts, graffiti, make-up, nails, live music—you name it— the LADIES LOVE PROJECT HOLIDAY POP-UP SHOP doesn’t get any more New York than this! “Having the LADIES LOVE PROJECT POP-UP SHOP in our space is a perfect fit,” says Alison Fleminger,  Manager of University Settlement space. “All of the vendors have styles that honor old New York, but each demonstrates a unique progression with great, must-have niche items.” “We are ecstatic and honored to be partnering with such a NYC institution of Art! We, the LLP team and event participants, are enthused to be hosted in this inviting space – the pop up will be sure to kick the holiday off with LOVE!”

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note to self: MAKE MORE ART

Recently I  completed 2 custom pieces for a collector. It was a pretty fun project. I’ve always been a bit of a spastic artist, flip flopping between materials and surfaces. It’s nice to get back to a flat surface and this project reminded me how nice it is to just make art….slow art, paint art, illustrative art. As much as I love my digital tools I’ve been missing the journey of using the analogue tools. These pieces are about 2 feet high and 5ft and 2ft by 3ft.

 

 

 

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COMIC CON NYC OCT 11th-14th

Hiya Sunshines,
We are just about all set up to rock the socks off of Comic Con! Oh yeah, we kinda forgot to tell you…geesh. Well things have really been just that crazies. Guess what, I just posted all the new goodies that I’ll have at Comic Con online, so in the case that you didn’t get your tickets (they are sold out) and fave anime character costume made, you ca shop butt naked from the comfort of your home (or at least a private place, if you insist on being butt naked).

In the case that you are attending Comic Con NY, I’ll be holding down booth #3140. Come say hi and hug up on the new Matilda plushies.

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How To Screenprint

Okay so you have an idea and want to print it all over the place. Here’s a lil help getting started.

Screen Printing Tutorial

Below are step-by-step instructions for 2 popular methods used to prepare a screen for screen printing–Drawing Fluid/Screen Filler Method and the Water Based Emulsion Method.

MATERIALS 10″ × 14″ Wooden Screen 9″ Plastic Squeegee Fabric Screen Printing Inks Screen Filler, 4 oz Drawing Fluid, 4 oz Photo Emulsion, 4 oz Photo Emulsion Remover, 4 oz Sensitizer, 0.5 g #6 Round Brush Mixing Sticks Iron

DRAWING FLUID/SCREEN FILLER METHOD

Step 1 on a sheet of plain paper, make up the illustrations or message you wish to print with your screen. Place this layout on a table top or other flat surface. Place your screen over this layout, top side up. Trace your design directly on the screen with a soft lead pencil.

Step 2 Select an appropriate brush. This will be determined by the type of line or texture that you want to be produced. You can work using either side of the screen. Remember that your printing will be done from the top (or “ink-fill”) side of the screen.

Step 3 Be certain that the screen is elevated–not touching the table. Paint the Drawing Fluid over those areas of your layout that you want to print. Leave the screen to dry in a level, flat position. Make sure nothing touches the areas covered with Drawing Fluid.

Step 4 After the drawing fluid is completely dry, open the screen filler and mix it thoroughly to a smooth consistency. Spoon it onto the screen fabric on the same side of the screen used for the application of Drawing Fluid. Use the squeegee or the plastic spreader to apply an evenly smooth coating over the entire screen. One pass over the screen should be sufficient. Multiple passes of screen filler will dissolve the Drawing Fluid and prevent character (image) washout.

Step 5 Again, put the screen to dry in a horizontal position making sure nothing touches the fabric. It is important that the Screen Filler dry completely.

Step 6 When the Screen Filler has dried thoroughly, spray cold water on both sides of the screen. Concentrate the spray on the areas where Drawing Fluid was applied. These areas will dissolve and the screen will become open at those points so that ink can flow through them.

Step 7 If some areas remain slightly blocked, scrub them lightly with a small stiff brush on both sides of the screen (an old toothbrush will do a good job). DO NOT USE HOT WATER DURING THIS STAGE. Allow your screen to dry in a level (horizontal) position, bottom-side up. Drying time may be accelerated by using a hair dryer or fan.

MAKING PRINTS: PRINTING WITH TEXTILE INKS

NOTE: When screen printing on fabrics, use only fabrics that can be subjected to temperatures of at least 275-375 degrees Farentheit. Do not use on nonporous fabrics such as nylon. Pre-test all fabrics. Fabrics with sizing must be washed prior to printing. This will assure proper adhesion of the textile ink to the fabric.

The screen frame is usually detached from the base and used by itself. Usually two people should work on the printing process-one holding the screen frame tightly against the fabric, and the other doing the printing. On articles like T-shirts, a piece of cardboard or paper must be put inside each garment to act as a barrier. This guarantees only one thickness of material will be printed by the ink.

Step 8 To transparentize or to improve the lubricity (slipperiness) of the ink, you may add the Transparent Base. To slow drying or to prevent screen clogging, add the Retarder Base.

Step 9 Wash-up of screens and tools must be done immediately after use. If they are allowed to dry on your screen or tools, they are difficult or impossible to remove. After the textile ink dries on the fabric, set a household iron at the highest heat that will not scorch the fabric and with a cloth or paper between the iron and printed material, iron on each side for 3 to 5 minutes. This will make the ink withstand repeated washings.

MULTICOLOR PRINTING

Step 10 Multi-color signs can be achieved easily by making one screen with the entire message on it. Prepare the screen by any method you prefer.

Once the screen is ready, simply block the words you do not want to print with your first color by putting masking tape or paper on the bottom side of the screen fabric.After you have made your first run of prints, wash the ink from the screen and let it dry. Follow this by blocking out the words you just printed and unblocking words you want to print with your second run of color. After you have made this second run, again wash the screen and let it dry.

NOW YOU’VE MADE YOUR OWN SCREEN PRINTED TEES! GOOD LUCK AND HAVE FUN!

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